wordtoyourmuggle:

single dad and his daughter’s kindergarten teacher.

paper-aint-having-any-of-this:

posamsterdam:

miseriathome:

cassehdrinksbleach:

"20 Creepiest Things You Can Whisper in Someone Else’s Ear While Giving Them a Hug"

I   M U S T   T R Y   T H E S E   O N   B R I A N

I’m gonna use some of them when I have to go to family reunions.

Number 5.

kisaxiii:

sizvideos:

Watch it in video

That’s not a pool that’s a water park oAo

turkeybaconese:

grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

 Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.
- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

this happens at work all the time. you’ll often see people standing in the walk-in cooler wondering what they’re doing in there.

turkeybaconese:

grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.

- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

this happens at work all the time. you’ll often see people standing in the walk-in cooler wondering what they’re doing in there.

rabioheab:

it’s time for leo dicaprio to give up on his acting career and open a coffee shop called Leonardo DiCappuccino 

Come on, Groot, do it for the Vine.

Peter Quill after discovering the Internet. (via patrickat)

So Tumblr has decided THIS will the pun of mine that gets 6,000+ notes. O_o

(via patrickat)

Pretty much, yeah.

superwhollock:

Reminder that Misha actually sent these tweets as the episode aired

deanisanactualprincess:

the supernatural cast doing the als challenge

winchester-hollywood-babylon:

releasethemurderbirds:

releasethemurderbirds:

My brother decided to use my bathroom and that was fine, but five minutes later I hear singing and he’s singing to the tune of “What’s This” for the Nightmare Before Christmas about various products I keep in the bathroom.

“What’s this, what’s this?

There’s products everywhere.

What’s this?

I think it goes in hair.”

Your brother is the man the world needs right now. That’s amazing…

calabozos:

onlylolgifs:

Ice Bucket Challenge Fail Compilation

you know those kids dead

samtung:

Been super into vikings lately, practicing my material rendering / prop design.

samtung:

Been super into vikings lately, practicing my material rendering / prop design.

biologicallybreak:

An owl taking a bath and being blow-dried. The noises I just made. 

Candid Cosplay Moment

bifrostedflake:

image

I found this photo floating around of me just chillin like a villain with my glasses on. Normally I leave them off. 

Smile, you’re on Candid Camera!